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The atrocities did not end with the removal of the Khmer Rouge from power. Due to the hatred of the Western powers and China for the Vietnamese communists, Pol Pot and his allies held on to the UN seat for Cambodia for the next 15 years. <br />
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With diplomatic recognition and military support from the West, Singapore, Thailand and China, the Khmer Rouge continued to function as an armed force in Cambodia until the mid-1990s.  At the same time, the UN and aid agencies were blocked from providing the support that Cambodia desperately needed to recover from the Khmer Rouge reign. <br />
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Malnutrition and violence continued to stalk the land. Health services remained in a desperate state and people continued to die of easily preventable diseases. In addition to the estimated 1.7 million people who died under the Khmer Rouge, it is important to ask how many more were sacrificed on the checkerboard of realpolitik in the years after.<br />
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On 17th April 1975, after five years of civil war, Cambodia's capital Phnom Penh fell to the Khmer Rouge, who instigated a brutal reign of terror that would see the death of some 1.7 million Cambodians. In an attempt to create a self-sufficient agrarian paradise, cities were emptied, money and religion were banned and roughly a quarter of the population was worked and starved to death or executed. <br />
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At the centre of this brutality was S-21, also known as Tuol Sleng, the Khmer Rouge prison located in the grounds of an old Phnom Penh school. Before the Vietnamese liberation of Phnom Penh on 7th January 1979, at least 14,000 people were tortured and executed here or at the nearby Choeung Ek killing field.

The atrocities did not end with the removal of the Khmer Rouge from power. Due to the hatred of the Western powers and China for the Vietnamese communists, Pol Pot and his allies held on to the UN seat for Cambodia for the next 15 years.

With diplomatic recognition and military support from the West, Singapore, Thailand and China, the Khmer Rouge continued to function as an armed force in Cambodia until the mid-1990s. At the same time, the UN and aid agencies were blocked...
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Copyright Rob Few