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New Paw Gay's family was brutally punished after fighting broke out near her home and two Burmese Army soldiers were killed. That evening, the army entered her village, captured the village head man and beat and tortured him until he pointed out every family who had relatives in one of the resistance movements. The soldiers then burned down the houses of these people and slaughtered their animals. Villagers stumbled out into the night lit by the crazy burning light of their own houses, surrounded by the terrified cries of their own pigs and cattle. Their homes for generations gone in minutes. <br />
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With nothing left, New Paw Gay escaped to Thailand.<br />
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There are around 1 million Burmese migrants living in Thailand. They exist in appalling poverty. Most are employed in backbreaking manual labour, on dangerous construction sites and fisheries or in karaoke bars and brothels.  They face constant harassment - wage exploitation, physical abuse, rape and even murder are commonplace and routinely go unpunished. Few have access to decent healthcare, to education or to legal protection. For the Burmese in Thailand, human rights are little more than a dream. And yet they choose to stay. Why? Because as bad as things are in Thailand, on the other side of the border, they are even worse.

New Paw Gay's family was brutally punished after fighting broke out near her home and two Burmese Army soldiers were killed. That evening, the army entered her village, captured the village head man and beat and tortured him until he pointed out every family who had relatives in one of the resistance movements. The soldiers then burned down the houses of these people and slaughtered their animals. Villagers stumbled out into the night lit by the crazy burning light of their own houses,...
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Copyright Rob Few