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With some difficulty, the coffin is lifted onto the back of a truck. On the way to the burial site, it doubles as a table for things that will be needed at the burial and as a chair for mourners to sit on. The paper thrown into the wind is part of a borrowed Chinese ritual to ensure happiness in the afterlife.<br />
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On April 27, Mrs Mool Klatalay was savagely beaten by her drunken husband. The beating took place in the hovel where Mool lived in a small sea gypsy village in southern Thailand's Phang Nga province. Villagers heard her screams, but no one intervened. No one took her to hospital. She died at home 48 hours later, after losing four pints of blood through internal bleeding. She leaves two sons, aged 19 and 12, and a daughter, aged 3.

With some difficulty, the coffin is lifted onto the back of a truck. On the way to the burial site, it doubles as a table for things that will be needed at the burial and as a chair for mourners to sit on. The paper thrown into the wind is part of a borrowed Chinese ritual to ensure happiness in the afterlife.

On April 27, Mrs Mool Klatalay was savagely beaten by her drunken husband. The beating took place in the hovel where Mool lived in a small sea gypsy village in southern...
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Copyright Rob Few