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One of the survivors was Vann Nath, who was kept alive by the regime to paint pictures of Pol Pot. After his release, he painted pictures of the tortures he witnessed while at S-21, such as these. In the foreground is one of the barrels shown in Vann Nath's painting.<br />
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On 17th April 1975, after five years of civil war, Cambodia's capital Phnom Penh fell to the Khmer Rouge, who instigated a brutal reign of terror that would see the death of some 1.7 million Cambodians. In an attempt to create a self-sufficient agrarian paradise, cities were emptied, money and religion were banned and roughly a quarter of the population was worked and starved to death or executed. <br />
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At the centre of this brutality was S-21, also known as Tuol Sleng, the Khmer Rouge prison located in the grounds of an old Phnom Penh school. Before the Vietnamese liberation of Phnom Penh on 7th January 1979, at least 14,000 people were tortured and executed here or at the nearby Choeung Ek killing field.

One of the survivors was Vann Nath, who was kept alive by the regime to paint pictures of Pol Pot. After his release, he painted pictures of the tortures he witnessed while at S-21, such as these. In the foreground is one of the barrels shown in Vann Nath's painting.

On 17th April 1975, after five years of civil war, Cambodia's capital Phnom Penh fell to the Khmer Rouge, who instigated a brutal reign of terror that would see the death of some 1.7 million Cambodians. In an attempt...
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Copyright Rob Few