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Separated from their parents for years at a time, these children are at horrible risk of abuse. Here, Shanti Lepcha, a field officer for the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), talks to a 13-year-old rape victim in a shelter for abused women. Discrimination in Nepal is so pervasive that police and other authorities routinely refuse to hear complaints made by Dalits and other marginalised groups. The OHCHR advocates to end discrimination and ensure that individual cases of abuse are investigated and prosecuted.<br />
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Among Nepal's untouchable class are the Kamaiya - a social group who have traditionally sold themselves and their children into bonded labour, for as little as US$50 a year. Even though the Kamaiya system has been legally abolished, the practice of bonded child labour, or kamalari, is still prevalent. The children perform menial labour, mostly as domestic servants, or in small businesses and on farms. They work all day, every day. They have no childhoods. They don't go to school. There is nowhere to turn if they are abused. They have almost no chance of breaking out of this poisonous system to make a better life for themselves or their own children in the future.<br />
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This has been going on for 2,000 years.

Separated from their parents for years at a time, these children are at horrible risk of abuse. Here, Shanti Lepcha, a field officer for the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), talks to a 13-year-old rape victim in a shelter for abused women. Discrimination in Nepal is so pervasive that police and other authorities routinely refuse to hear complaints made by Dalits and other marginalised groups. The OHCHR advocates to end discrimination and ensure that individual cases...
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Copyright Rob Few