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Philamena Aluku lives in Pabbo camp and is living with HIV. In 1994, Philamena's husband returned home after nearly a year fighting in the bush. Along with his nightmares and atrocity stories, he brought back the HIV virus and infected his wife. <br />
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Philamena is still alive thanks to a regimen of anti-retroviral drugs - the medicine that can keep the HIV virus in check. But Pilamena cannot take these drugs anymore because her poor diet and unhealthy life in the camp have left her too weak. Now she is on an emergency course of soya milk and nutritional supplements to build up her strength. No one knows if she will survive. If she doesn't, her death will add to the thousands of lives already lost through direct violence in Uganda's civil war.<br />
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During the 20-year civil war in Northern Uganda, well over a million people have been forced from their homes into camps. Fleeing the horrific abuses that have characterised this conflict - including widespread killing, rape, torture and mutilation - they have exchanged a peaceful existence as subsistence farmers for a life of destitution and dust. This is just one one those camps. Located in Amuru district, it is home to some 40,000 men, women and children. The war has reached an uneasy peace, but many people still do not dare to go home, even though they have been waiting for two decades. And in a country with an average life expectancy of just 47 years, that's a long time to wait.<br />
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While they do, the United Nations Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) is working to ensure that they can live in safety and dignity. This means the Office monitors human rights abuses, trains the police who manage the camps, and makes sure that the people here know their entitlements and where they can go for help when they need it.

Philamena Aluku lives in Pabbo camp and is living with HIV. In 1994, Philamena's husband returned home after nearly a year fighting in the bush. Along with his nightmares and atrocity stories, he brought back the HIV virus and infected his wife.

Philamena is still alive thanks to a regimen of anti-retroviral drugs - the medicine that can keep the HIV virus in check. But Pilamena cannot take these drugs anymore because her poor diet and unhealthy life in the camp have left her...
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Copyright Rob Few